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What is the Average Life Expectancy of Your New Leaf Springs?

What is the Average Life Expectancy of Your New Leaf Springs?

Many different factors can lead to leaf spring wear, and because of this, there is no easy way to determine how long a set of new leaf springs will last. The weight and frequency of loads, along with wear from dirt and grime, can all lead to early wear. However, if you are used to riding with a light load and clean and maintain your leaf springs regularly, you can expect to get a surprisingly long life out of your suspension.

How Long Do Leaf Springs Last?

Like your tires, brakes, batteries, belts and other auto parts, the leaf springs in the suspension system will eventually need replacing. How long leaf springs last and when to replace them depends on a variety of considerations, ranging from the age of your vehicle and how often it's used to the stress put on them and environmental factors.

If you primarily drive your pickup on the highway to and from work and keep it in a garage, your springs can last well over 100,000 miles. When you use your truck on the job and regularly haul heavy loads and tow to maximum capacity, it will inevitably shorten your leaf springs' life expectancy. Using products such as add a leafs, heavy-duty coil springs, SuperSprings and replacement shackles, hangers and bolts will help leaf springs last longer.

Since it's inevitable you will eventually have to replace your leaf springs, it's less of a concern when they will wear out and more about knowing when to make repairs. Staying in tune with how your vehicle's suspension is operating and performing inspections will ensure you're alerted when service is required.

How Can You Tell If Your Leaf Springs Are Worn?

Signs you need to replace leaf springs range from subtle noises such as squeaking and creaking when going over rough terrain to bottoming out on bumps and inclines. Additional clues your leaf springs are getting old and starting to sag include poor handling and braking and the inability to carry and pull loads.

An easy way to check the health of your suspension, including your leaf springs, is to park on a level surface and look at the vehicle from a low vantage point to see if it’s dipping down on one side. A tilted car or truck body can indicate uneven wear on your leaf springs. If you see this behavior, then doing a more thorough inspection is in order.

When inspecting your leaf springs, look for wear in the areas where two parts of the leaf springs meet. It is when metal components rub together that you can experience wear of the spring metal, which can lead to cracks or broken springs that can cause problems with your suspension system. It's also important to take a close look at the conditions of the hangers, shackles and other components that support a leaf spring suspension system and promptly replace parts when necessary.

How Do You Maintain Your Leaf Springs?

The best defense against leaf spring wear is to perform a routine inspection at the first indication of trouble. With the car or truck suspended, remove the tire so that you have good access to the leaf springs and other suspension parts. You will find that the leaf springs could be coated with dirt, grit, or grime, so first, clean them off with a cloth and with a wire brush.

Once the leaf springs are clean, you can look at the leaf springs a little better for wear, cracks and breaks. It’s also possible that the leaves could have moved due to loosening of the brackets. It is sometimes possible to nudge these back by hammering and tightening the clamps, but do not do this if any wear has started to show on the leaf springs.

Unless the leaves are still in good condition, a replacement would be your best choice. General Spring offers a broad range of products for repairing suspension systems, including standard and heavy-duty leaf spring kits. Custom leaf spring solutions are also available for older models where parts are hard to find or trucks with applications that call for increased weight capacities.

General Spring: Your Suspension Experts for All Your Questions on Leaf Springs

The best defense against leaf spring wear is to perform a routine inspection at the first indication of trouble. With the car or truck suspended, remove the tire so that you have good access to the leaf springs and other suspension parts. You will find that the leaf springs could be coated with dirt, grit, or grime, so first, clean them off with a cloth and with a wire brush.

Once the leaf springs are clean, you can look at the leaf springs a little better for wear, cracks and breaks. It’s also possible that the leaves could have moved due to loosening of the brackets. It is sometimes possible to nudge these back by hammering and tightening the clamps, but do not do this if any wear has started to show on the leaf springs.

Unless the leaves are still in good condition, a replacement would be your best choice. General Spring offers a broad range of products for repairing suspension systems, including standard and heavy-duty leaf spring kits. Custom leaf spring solutions are also available for older models where parts are hard to find or trucks with applications that call for increased weight capacities.

Get in Touch for More on Leaf Spring Life Expectancy and Repairing Your Suspension

We partner with professional mechanics and do-it-yourself auto enthusiasts to provide the quality products and service you need to maintain your vehicles. From competitive prices and fast shipping across the U.S. to ongoing customer service and technical installation support, we're the one-stop shop for repairing, replacing or upgrading your suspension.

When you need advice on any type of suspension products, we are here to help. Shop our website and contact us online to request to speak with a live representative about your project. We'll be happy to answer your questions about the average life expectancy of your new leaf springs and provide assistance placing your order.

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2004 - 2008 Ford F150 rear leaf spring, 3(2/1) leaves, 1500lbs capacity 2004 - 2008 Ford F150 rear leaf spring, 3(2/1) leaves, 1500lbs capacity

  • Spring Capacity = 1500 lbs
  • Width = 3
  • # of Leaves = 3(2/1)
  • Measures (A/B) = 25-5/8 x 31-3/8
  • Pack Thickness = 1-5/8
  • Bushings Included
  • Sold Per Side - Order Quantity 2 for a pair

Our Price: $109.99
2002 - 2008 Ram 1500 heavy duty rear leaf spring, 5(4/1) leaves, 2200 lbs capacity 2002 - 2008 Ram 1500 heavy duty rear leaf spring, 5(4/1) leaves, 2200 lbs capacity

  • Spring Capacity = 2200 lbs
  • Width = 2-1/2
  • # of Leaves = 5(4/1)
  • Measures (A/B) = 31-1/4 x 32
  • Pack Thickness = 2-1/4
  • Bushings Included
  • Sold Per Side - Order Quantity 2 for a pair

Our Price: $119.99
2005 - 2015 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 / Prerunner Heavy Duty rear leaf spring, 4(3/1) leaves 2005 - 2015 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 / Prerunner Heavy Duty rear leaf spring, 4(3/1) leaves

  • Width = 2-3/8
  • # of Leaves = 4(3/1)
  • Measures (A/B) = 27-11/16 x 27-11/16
  • Pack Thickness = 1-7/8
  • Bushings Included
  • Sold Per Side

Our Price: $169.99